Free Byron

Yellow Square bearing the words Free Byron in black text

Today was the first day of Byron Sonne’s trial.

Byron was arrested on June 22nd, 2010, before the Toronto G20. 

On June 29th, Jesse Brown did a SearchEngine interview that would have made me question the story if I’d heard it. 

But I don’t live in Toronto, and it wasn’t until much later that I learned about Byron Sonne.

Denise Balkissoon, the writer who wrote the Toronto Life cover story blogged about the publication ban: “EXPLAINER: What we can and can’t say about the Byron Sonne Trial

Today’s Globe and Mail reported on the first day G20 trial begins for man charged with possessing explosives. The way the headline reads reveals the Globe’s corporate bias (if there was any doubt).

What struck me the most about the Globe article was the reporter’s statement:

 

Supporters have organized a “Free Byron” movement.”

— Colin Perkel, G20 trial begins for man charged with possessing explosives

In many ways, Byron’s arrest before the Toronto G20 summit even began served to separate his story from all the other stories of G20 protest. The Toronto G20 protests might be considered a “movement,” but I don’t think that the support for Byron Sonne can be thought of in that light.

Byron Sonne’s friends and community have tried to support him the best they can. That’s what friends do if they believe in you, and it’s why humans belong to communities. Byron Sonne’s friends know him as a person, and they believe in him. It says a lot about Byron and his friends that they have stuck by him all through this. Because standing up for someone facing the kind of charges levelled against Byron Sonne takes guts. After all, people are often judged on who their friends are.

His friends and supporters set up a webpage to allow interested people to follow what happens to Byron. They have distributed stickers and buttons and asked interested people to post “Free Byron” badges on their blogs. I haven’t seen anything I could characterize as a “movement,” just people supporting a friend and member of their community.

Sure, there are people like me who care what happens to Byron. When I saw a “Free Bryron” button and asked what it was for, I ended up becoming a Free Byron supporter. I am not Byron’s friend, having never actually met him, although we’ve exchanged a couple of letters, and I watched a few days of one of his hearings.

I’m not a lawyer, nor am I in possession of all the facts. Still, I don’t believe Bryon Sonne is a terrorist, or anything like it. I think Byron is a good person who tried to stand up for what he believed was right.

I think Byron believed the protections in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms would protect him. So far they haven’t much, and that scares me. That’s the main reason why I support Byron Sonne.

But I’m not part of “a movement,” just a citizen who hopes Canada is the country that I think it is, and that justice will prevail.

Byron Sonne has lost his wife, his home, his business, his reputation, his privacy and his liberty.

And I wonder what he has done to deserve this.

One thought on “Free Byron

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