Municipal Proportional Representation

My submission to Ontario’s municipal ranked ballot consultation

Q: What are your thoughts on using ranked ballots for Ontario municipal elections?
A: I disagree with even considering ranked ballots for municipal use unless they are used to introduce an element of proportionality to the electoral process. In order to achieve this there is a need for multi-member districts or offices so Ranked Ballots might be used in an STV (Single Transferable Vote) system.

Q: Should municipalities be able to use ranked ballots for certain offices and not others? For example, only for mayor?

A: I have never bought into the idea that instant runoff voting is somehow more democratic than any other winner-take-all system. This is why I don’t agree with any winner-take-all method to elect a mayor. Ranked ballots should only be used in multi-member races to ensure a proportional outcome (again, as in STV).

The proportionally elected municipal council could select the mayor. The idea of democracy is to make government accountable to the people, so investing a disproportionate amount of power in the office of leader seems more like re-establishing a non-hereditary monarchy via by election. That might have seemed reasonable when they signed the Magna Carta, but we ought to be able to do better than that in the 21st century.

Q: Should public consultation by a municipality be required before implementing ranked ballots or before changing from ranked ballots back to the current system?

A: Any major change to our electoral process should require both public education and consultation.

Q: What form should that consultation take?

A: Empanelling an independent citizen’s assembly to study the issue and make recommendations would be a good start. It is critical that enough time is allotted to do this work. After the recommendations are made, there should be should be public consultation meetings, ideally conducted both online and off before following up with a binding referendum requiring a simple majority. Once the new system is chosen there should be a set time or number of elections for the new system to be practiced, after which a second referendum to determine whether to keep it, try something else or return to the old way should be held.

Q: Unlike the current system, ranked ballots can involve multiple rounds of counting before all the seats to be elected have been won.

How much information would you want about election results? For example, where there have been multiple rounds of counting would you want to see the results of each round of counting or just the final results?

A: The details of all the results should be shared in the interest of open government. This can be done easily and cheaply in a digital world.

Q: Are there other ideas you wish to share on ranked ballots that you would like us to consider?

A: If ranked ballots are to be used in a non-proportional winner-take-all system, multiple rounds of counting wherein candidates are dropped from the race must require multiple votes, not instant runoff voting.
ON pr

One thought on “Municipal Proportional Representation

  1. Hi! FYI: the legislation will most definitely include proportional STV as an option for Ontario’s municipalities.

    We’ve been pushing very hard for a proportional model, as part of the 123Ontario campaign.

    http://123ontario.ca/

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